alexa The inheritance of chilling tolerance in tomato (Lycopersicon spp.).
Agri and Aquaculture

Agri and Aquaculture

Advances in Crop Science and Technology

Author(s): Venema JH, Linger P, van Heusden AW, van Hasselt PR, Brggemann W

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Abstract During the past 25 years, chilling tolerance of the cultivated (chilling-sensitive) tomato Lycopersicon esculentum and its wild, chilling-tolerant relatives L. peruvianum and L. hirsutum (and, less intensively studied, L. chilense) has been the object of several investigations. The final aim of these studies can be seen in the increase in chilling tolerance of the cultivated genotypes. In this review, we will focus on low-temperature effects on photosynthesis and the inheritance of these traits to the offspring of various breeding attempts. While crossing L. peruvianum (male symbol) to L. esculentum (female symbol) so far has brought the most detailed insight with respect to physiological questions, for practical purposes, e.g., the readily cross ability, crossing programmes with L. hirsutum as pollen donor at present seem to be a promising way to achieve higher chilling-tolerant genotypes of the cultivated tomato. This perspective is due to the progress that has been made with respect to the genetic basis of chilling tolerance of Lycopersicon spp. over the past five years. This article was published in Plant Biol (Stuttg) and referenced in Advances in Crop Science and Technology

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