alexa The liver in celiac disease.
Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology

Journal of Gastrointestinal & Digestive System

Author(s): RubioTapia A, Murray JA

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Celiac disease is a common (1\% prevalence) chronic immune-mediated disorder of the small intestine induced by dietary wheat, barley, and rye. Several hepatic disorders have been described in association with celiac disease. Isolated hypertransaminasemia with nonspecific histologic changes in a liver biopsy is the commonest hepatic presentation of celiac disease. A gluten-free diet normalizes liver enzymes and histologic changes in most patients. Moreover, celiac disease can coexist with autoimmune liver disorders such as autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Celiac disease has increasingly been reported with a variety of other liver diseases. Thus, the hepatologist needs to consider celiac disease in the differential of abnormal liver blood tests and to be aware of the clinical implications of this frequent disease in patients with liver disorders. The possible mechanisms of liver injury and those common factors that explain the association of celiac disease with liver disorders are discussed. The aims of this article are (1) to review the spectrum and pathogenesis of liver injury related to celiac disease and (2) to provide direction to those caring for patients with chronic liver diseases regarding the detection and effective treatment of celiac disease. This article was published in Hepatology and referenced in Journal of Gastrointestinal & Digestive System

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords