alexa The neural correlates of cue-induced craving in cocaine-dependent women.
Microbiology

Microbiology

Journal of Antivirals & Antiretrovirals

Author(s): Kilts CD, Gross RE, Ely TD, Drexler KP

Abstract Share this page

Abstract OBJECTIVE: Drug use reminders are associated with localized changes in brain activity related to intense drug wanting or craving in cocaine-dependent men. While cocaine dependence is prevalent and disabling in women, and certain clinically relevant sex differences exist, there is an absence of knowledge related to the neural correlates of cocaine craving in cocaine-dependent women. METHOD: The differential neural response to imagery depicting cocaine use and neutral imagery was defined by using [15O]H2O positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in eight cocaine-dependent women. Results were compared with a matched group of eight cocaine-dependent men. RESULTS: Cocaine-related imagery was associated with relative increases in cocaine craving and increases in regional cerebral blood flow in the superior temporal gyrus, dorsal anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, nucleus accumbens area, and the central sulcus. Compared with the results of an identical PET study in matched cocaine-dependent men, conditioned cocaine craving in women was associated with less activation of the amygdala, insula, orbitofrontal cortex, and ventral cingulate cortex and greater activation of the central sulcus and widely distributed frontal cortical areas. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the presence of sex differences in the functional anatomy of cue-induced cocaine craving associated with drug dependence. Such differences may reflect sex differences in conditioned associations to cocaine use, in affective and other corollaries of cocaine craving, or in their volitional regulation and may underlie apparent sex differences in the effects of cocaine abstinence and the expectations of treatment outcome. Some support for the need for sex-specific strategies for treatment of cocaine dependence is also furnished by the findings of this study. This article was published in Am J Psychiatry and referenced in Journal of Antivirals & Antiretrovirals

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords