alexa The role of intrinsic muscle flaps of the foot for bone coverage in foot and ankle defects in diabetic and nondiabetic patients.
Pharmaceutical Sciences

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Clinical Pharmacology & Biopharmaceutics

Author(s): Attinger CE, Ducic I, Cooper P, Zelen CM

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Abstract Local muscle flaps, pioneered by Ger in the late 1960s, were extensively used for foot and ankle reconstruction until the late 1970s when, with the evolution of microsurgery, microsurgical free flaps became the reconstructive method of choice. To assess whether the current underuse of local muscle flaps in foot and ankle surgery is justified, the authors identified from the Georgetown Limb Salvage Registry all patients who underwent foot and ankle reconstruction with local muscle flaps and microsurgical free flaps from 1990 through 1998. By protocol, flap coverage was the reconstructive choice for defects with exposed tendons, joints, or bone. Local muscle flaps were selected over free flaps if the defect was small (3 x 6 cm or less) and within reach of the local muscle flap. During the same time frame, the authors performed 45 free flaps (96 percent success rate) in the same areas when the defects were too large or out of reach of local muscle flaps. Thirty-two consecutive patients underwent local muscle flap reconstruction for 19 diabetic wounds and 13 traumatic wounds. All wounds, after debridement, had exposed bone at their base, with osteomyelitis being present in 52 percent of the diabetic wounds and in 70 percent of the nondiabetic wounds. Wounds were located in the hindfoot (47 percent), midfoot (44 percent), and ankle (9 percent). Vascular disease was more prevalent in the diabetic group, in which 42 percent of the affected limbs required revascularization procedures before reconstruction (versus 7 percent in the nondiabetic group). Subsequently, 83 total operations were required to heal the wounds, of which 46 percent were limited to debridement only. Thirty-four pedicled muscle flaps were used: 19 abductor digiti minimi (56 percent), nine abductor hallucis (26 percent), three extensor digitorum brevis (9 percent), two flexor digitorum brevis (6 percent), and one flexor digiti minimi (3 percent). An additional skin graft for complete coverage was required in 18 patients (53 percent). One patient died and one flap developed distal necrosis, for a 96 percent success rate. The complication rate was 26 percent and included patient death, dehiscence, and partial flap or split-thickness skin graft loss. Twenty-nine of the 32 wounds healed. One patient died in the postoperative period; in two others the wounds failed to heal and required below-knee amputations, for an overall limb salvage rate of 91 percent. Diabetes did not significantly affect healing and limb salvage rates. Diabetes, however, did affect healing times (twofold increase), length of stay (2.7 times as long), and long-term survival (63 percent survival in diabetic patients versus 100 percent in the trauma group). Local muscle flaps provide a simpler, less expensive, and successful alternative to microsurgical free flaps for foot and ankle defects that have exposed bone (with or without osteomyelitis), tendon, or joint at their base. Diabetes does not appear to adversely affect the effectiveness of these flaps. Local muscle flaps should remain on the forefront of possible reconstructive options when treating small foot and ankle wounds that have exposed bone, tendon, or joint. This article was published in Plast Reconstr Surg and referenced in Clinical Pharmacology & Biopharmaceutics

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