alexa The use of a closed-suction drain in total knee arthroplasty. A prospective, randomised study.
Haematology

Haematology

Journal of Hematology & Thromboembolic Diseases

Author(s): Esler CN, Blakeway C, Fiddian NJ

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Abstract We prospectively randomised 100 patients undergoing cemented total knee replacement to receive either a single deep closed-suction drain or no drain. The total blood loss was significantly greater in those with a drain (568 ml versus 119 ml, p < 0.01; 95\% CI 360 to 520) although those without lost more blood into the dressings (55 ml versus 119 ml, p < 0.01; 95\% CI -70 to 10). There was no statistical difference in the postoperative swelling or pain score, or in the incidence of pyrexia, ecchymosis, time at which flexion was regained or the need for manipulation, or in the incidence of infection at a minimum of five years after surgery in the two groups. We have been unable to provide evidence to support the use of a closed-suction drain in cemented knee arthroplasty. It merely interferes with mobilisation and complicates nursing. Reinfusion drains may, however, prove to be beneficial.
This article was published in J Bone Joint Surg Br and referenced in Journal of Hematology & Thromboembolic Diseases

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