alexa UKPDS 26: Sulphonylurea failure in non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients over six years. UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Group.
Diabetes & Endocrinology

Diabetes & Endocrinology

Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism

Author(s): Matthews DR, Cull CA, Stratton IM, Holman RR, Turner RC

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (DM) on sulphonylurea therapy convert to insulin progressively as the sulphonylureas 'fail'. The rate of failure and the features of those who fail have been poorly described. To assess secondary failure rates of sulphonylureas, we report on the responses in 1305 patients with newly diagnosed Type 2 DM randomly allocated to therapy with either chlorpropamide or glibenclamide in the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS). These patients were initially treated by diet for 3 months and had a fasting plasma glucose > 6 mmol l(-1); mean age 53 (SD 9) years; BMI 26.8 (SD 5.0) kg m(-2); and median fasting plasma glucose 9.1 (7.6-12.5 quartiles) mmol l(-1). If their fasting plasma glucose subsequently rose above 15.0 mmol l(-1), or they developed hyperglycaemic symptoms, additional hypoglycaemic therapy was given: metformin, ultratard insulin, and soluble insulin as required. By 6 years, 44\% had required additional therapy. Of those randomized to glibenclamide, 48\% required additional therapy by 6 years, compared with 40\% of those allocated to chlorpropamide (p < 0.01). Sixty-one per cent, 39\%, and 23\%, respectively, of patients with fasting plasma glucose > or = 10.0 mmol l(-1), > or = 7.8 mmol l(-1) to < 10.0 mmol l(-1) and < 7.8 mmol l(-1) at randomization required additional therapy (p < 0.001). In the initial 3 years, non-obese subjects (BMI < 30 kg m(-2)) were more likely to require additional therapy than obese patients (BMI > or = 30 kg m(-2)) (43\% vs 53\% at 6 years; p < 0.001). Modelled beta-cell function showed that those with lower function were more likely to fail (p < 0.0001). Thus sulphonylureas fail as a therapeutic agent at rates which are dependent both on the phenotype at presentation and perhaps on the agent used initially. Higher failure rates were found in those with higher glucose concentrations, those who were younger, those with lower beta-cell reserve and those randomized to glibenclamide compared with chlorpropamide. This article was published in Diabet Med and referenced in Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords