alexa Why iron deficiency is important in infant development.
Pediatrics

Pediatrics

Maternal and Pediatric Nutrition

Author(s): Beard JL

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Infants who experience iron deficiency during the first 6-12 mo of life are likely to experience persistent effects of the deficiency that alter functioning in adulthood. A lack of sufficient iron intake may significantly delay the development of the central nervous system as a result of alterations in morphology, neurochemistry, and bioenergetics. Depending on the stage of development at the time of iron deficiency, there may be an opportunity to reverse adverse effects, but the success of repletion efforts appear to be time dependent. Publications in the past several years describe the emerging picture of the consequences of iron deficiency in both human and animal studies. The mechanisms for iron accumulation in the brain and perhaps redistribution are being understood. The data in human infants are consistent with altered myelination of white matter, changes in monoamine metabolism in striatum, and functioning of the hippocampus. Rodent studies also show effects of iron deficiency during gestation and lactation that persist into adulthood despite restoration of iron status at weaning. These studies indicate that gestation and early lactation are likely critical periods when iron deficiency will result in long-lasting damage.
This article was published in J Nutr and referenced in Maternal and Pediatric Nutrition

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords