alexa Abstract | Assessment of Knowledge Regarding Risk Factors of Hepatitis C Virus Transmission and Options to avoid them

International Journal of Collaborative Research on Internal Medicine & Public Health
Open Access

OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations

700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

Abstract

Background: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is affecting 170 million p eople annually (WHO, 2012) and Pakistan ranks high in chronic hepatitis. HCV i s a leading cause of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma rapidly transmitting as silent killer.

Methods: Comparative cross-sectional facility based survey b etween HCV positive (n = 344) and negative (n = 176) respondents at Taluka Hospit al (OPD), Rural District, Sindh using structured questionnaire and open ended questions. Analysis was done by cross-tabulation and Chi-square test.

Aim: To improve the knowledge of risk factors of HCV tra nsmission.

Objectives: 1. To assess the knowledge regarding risk factors of H CV transmission. 2. To identify the options to avoid the risk factors a ssociated with HCV transmission.

Results: A total of 520 respondents having 66% frequency of HCV infection were interviewed. Highest infection was in 21-30 years ages (39.0%) w ith more infection in urban population (75.6%) and illiterate group (52.9%), followed by f armers (30.5%) and laborer (26.7%). Majority of HCV positive respondents had misperceptions of w ater (11.3%; P < 0.036), food (10.3%; P = 0.283), heat (10.1%; (P = 0.412), and mosquitoes (9 .9%; P < 0.003) as the major factors of HCV transmission. History of therapeutic injections/yea r (60%; P < 0.0001), surgery (80%; P < 0.009), shaving at barber’s shop (64.2%; P < 0.119) , sharing tooth brush, razor and miswak, (82%, 77% and 88.1% respectively; P < 0.0001, P < 0 .0001, P < 0.0001) was more in HCV positive respondents. More family deaths due to hep atitis had occurred in HCV positive respondents. The qualitative component reinforced t he findings of misperceptions. Respondents suggested launching auto disable, introducing dispo sable dental/surgical instruments and registering barber’s shops with a policy to use new blade and razor for each customer.

Conclusion: There is health communication gap while getting car e from health professionals during treatment of hepatitis. Health department sh ould ensure health education and awareness sessions to remove the misperceptions of patients a nd prevention of transmission of the disease.

To read the full article Peer-reviewed Article PDF image | Peer-reviewed Full Article image

Author(s): Aijaz Ali Samina Naeem Khalid Huma Qureshi

Keywords

Hepatitis C, Risk Factors, Transmission, Knowledge, Misperceptions, Immunization, Adverse Drug Events Reporting, Critical care medicine

 
Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords