alexa Abstract | Date Rape Experiences and Help-seeking Behaviour among Female University Students in Ibadan, Nigeria

International Journal of Collaborative Research on Internal Medicine & Public Health
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Abstract

Background: Date rape is a public health concern in Nigeria. The burden of the problem in Nigerian Universities is, however, yet to be fully investigated.

Objectives: The study was therefore designed to determine the prevalence of date rape, context of its occurrence and help-seeking behaviour among female undergraduates of the University of Ibadan.

Methods: The cross-sectional survey was conducted among 610 female undergraduates selected using a multi-stage random sampling technique. A semi-structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square and logistic regression.

Results: Respondents’ mean age was 21.0 ± 2.5 years, 50.5% were sexually experienced and prevalence of date rape was 11.8%. The forms of date rape ever experienced included forced vagina sex (80.3%), forced anal sex (10.5%), forced oral sex (15.8%) and forced insertion of fingers into the vagina (32.9%). Date rape was experienced by majority (73.6%) of the survivors when they became undergraduates. Respondents aged 17 -19 were at higher risk of date rape (OR: 4.69, 95%CI: 1.99 – 11.04, P = 0.001) than other age groups. Date rape was experienced by 73.3% in perpetrators’ residence outside the campus. Most (91.5%) survivors of date rape never sought any medical help, legal redress, or counseling services. Reasons adduced for not seeking medical services included lack of serious physical injury (53.0%) and fear of stigmatization (12.1%). Many (57.3%) felt it was not necessary to seek for counseling services.

Conclusions: Date rape is a reality at the University and majority of the victims were adolescents. Most victims did not seek help, a development that can compound effective rehabilitation. Campus-based educational activities aimed at promoting the sexual rights of female undergraduates, social support for survivors, and provision of survivors with rape prevention skills are needed for addressing the problem.

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Author(s): Ogunwale Akintayo Olamide Oshiname Frederick Olore Ajuwon Ademola Johnson

Keywords

Female undergraduates, Dating experience, Rape prevalence, Help-seeking behaviour

 
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