alexa Moyamoya disease | Singapore| PDF | PPT| Case Reports | Symptoms | Treatment

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Moyamoya Disease

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  • Moyamoya disease

    Pathophysiology:
    Moyamoya disease is a rare, progressive cerebrovascular disorder caused by blocked arteries at the base of the brain in an area called the basal ganglia. The name “moyamoya” means “puff of smoke” in Japanese and describes the look of the tangle of tiny vessels formed to compensate for the blockage. It primarily affects children, but it can also occur in adults. In children, the first symptom of Moyamoya disease is often stroke, or recurrent transient ischemic attacks.

  • Moyamoya disease

    Statistics:
    A retrospective survey of 38 cases of Moyamoya disease was done. The majority of patients were adults, and Chinese. There was a relative paucity of juveniles in our series which appear to differentiate it from singapore results. The majority of adults presented with either subarachnoid haemorrhage or motor paresis. Associated aneurysms were noted in 3 cases.

  • Moyamoya disease

    Treatment:
    There are several types of revascularization surgery that can restore blood flow to the brain by opening narrowed blood vessels or by bypassing blocked arteries. Children usually respond better to revascularization surgery than adults, but the majority of individuals have no further strokes or related problems after surgery.

  • Moyamoya disease

    Major Research:
    Recent investigations have established that both moyamoya disease and arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) of the lining of the brain, the dura, are associated with dural angiogenesis. These factors may represent a mechanism for ischemia contributing to the formation of dural AVFs. At least one case of simultaneous unilateral moyamoya disease and ipsilateral dural arteriovenous fistula has been reported at the Barrow Neurological Institute.

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