alexa Asthma And Sleep Open Access Articles|OMICS International|Journal Of Sleep Disorders And Therapy

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Asthma And Sleep Open Access Articles

Asthma is a condition in which one’s airways get narrow and swells and produces extra mucus. This can makes breathing difficult and trigger coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath. For some people, asthma is a minor problem. For some others, it can be a major problem that can interferes with daily activities and may lead to a life-threatening asthma attack. Asthma can't be cured, but its symptoms can be controlled. Asthma is caused by inflammation of the airways. While there is no cure for asthma, there are a number of treatments that can help effectively control the condition. Treatment of asthma is based on two important aspects: relieving symptoms, preventing future symptoms and attacks from developing. Treatment and prevention involves a combination of medicines, lifestyle advice, and identifying and then avoiding potential asthma triggers. People with asthma often suffer from night time coughing, wheezing and breathlessness that disturb their sleep. It is not clear whether there is a circadian rhythm factor responsible for these nighttime disturbances or whether sleep in some way contributes to them, but studies designed to uncover the exact influence of sleep or circadian rhythms on asthma have been largely inconclusive. Even so, many researchers believe that asthmatic symptoms are at least partly due to circadian rhythms and use the term "nocturnal asthma" to describe the phenomenon of asthma symptoms worsening at night. Not all asthma sufferers experience nocturnal asthma. Those who do should discuss their symptoms with their doctor in order to develop a treatment plan that addresses the nighttime condition. People with asthma should also be aware that nocturnal asthma is associated with more severe disease and increased mortality. Open access to the scientific literature means the removal of barriers (including price barriers) from accessing scholarly work. There are two parallel “roads” towards open access: Open Access articles and self-archiving. Open Access articles are immediately, freely available on their Web site, a model mostly funded by charges paid by the author (usually through a research grant). The alternative for a researcher is “self-archiving” (i.e., to publish in a traditional journal, where only subscribers have immediate access, but to make the article available on their personal and/or institutional Web sites (including so-called repositories or archives)), which is a practice allowed by many scholarly journals.
 
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Last date updated on September, 2014