alexa canadian brown swiss and braunvieh association

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canadian brown swiss and braunvieh association

The Brown Swiss breed is possibly the purest of all recognized breeds of dairy cattle. It is definitely believed there was little or no infusion of foreign blood, no apparent crossing with other cattle throughout the establishment of the breed. So well fixed did the characteristics of the breed become, and so apparent was the prepotency and vigour of the animals, that cattle raisers from Germany, Italy, and other surrounding domains made regular importations of Swiss stock to strengthen the productive quality of their herds. The first Brown Swiss in Canada were imported to the Eastern townships of Quebec from the United States in 1888. Although considered a dual-purpose breed (dairy and beef) in Europe, pioneer North American breeders recognized their great potential for milk production and concentrated their efforts for improvement in the direction of developing a dairy cow. Brown Swiss are now found throughout Canada. He original characteristics including size, ruggedness, strong sound feet and legs that wear, quality udders that last, and thriftiness and gain-ability have been maintained and improved. These quiet, docile tempered cows are ideally suited for either the family-sized farm or the large commercial operation in any climate. Brown Swiss, being hardy and rugged, perform well in all climates and at all altitudes. Brown Swiss are found throughout Canada presently and many Canadian animals are sold to foreign buyers. The beef aspect of the big brown cow was developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s during the "exotic" beef rush. These beef focused animals are known as Braunvieh. Braunvieh is a German term which translates to "brown cattle". Since they were of the same original genetic stock as the Brown Swiss, they were entered into the Brown Swiss herd book. The Braunvieh breeders have long suffered under the shadow of their dairy counterparts, but have sales to South American markets equalling the demand for the Brown Swiss.

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