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Biography

Jian Hua Wang, M.D. completed her medical degree at Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, P. R. China. Dr. Wang is board certified in gynaecology and obstetrics, and currently serves as chief physician in gynaecology and obstetrics at Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, P. R. China. Dr. Wang does a full range of obstetrics & gynecology with extensive experience in reproductive health, family planning, reproductive endocrinology, minimally invasive surgical procedures with hysteroscopy and laparoscopy, high risk obstetrics. She has published more than 10 papers in reputed SCI journals

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection might be associated with vertical transmission of it. To assess the possible role of CMV infection in early pregnancy failure (missed miscarriages). Methods: Subjects include normal pregnancies and missed miscarriages at early gestation undergoing dilatation and curettage (D&C). All the subjects were given the measurements of serum anti-CMV antibodies by a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay and CMV-DNA detection in blood, urine and cervical secretion by real time PCR. There were 63 subjects with positive CMV-DNA in cervical secretion. According to positive to negative CMV DNA (in cervical secretion) ratio of 2:1, 38 subjects with negative CMV-DNA in cervical secretion were selected randomly. The 101 subjects received CMV DNA test in placental villi/deciduas during D&C. Results: Anti-CMV IgG seroprevalence were found in 100.0% (63 cases) with 1.6% of IgM positive case (1 case) in the 63 women with positive CMV-DNA in cervical secretion. In the 38 women with negative CMV-DNA in cervical secretion, anti-CMV IgG seroprevalence were found in 92.1% (35 cases) without IgM positive case. CMV-DNA in blood was negative in all 101 subjects. Positive CMV-DNA in placental villi/deciduas was present in 5 cases (7.9%; 2 normal pregnancies and 3 missed miscarriages) of women with positive CMV-DNA in cervical secretion. No case of negative CMV-DNA in cervical secretion was found with positive CMV-DNA in placental villi/deciduas. The rate of missed miscarriages was 52.4% (33/63) and 42.1% (16/38) in women with positive and negative HCMV DNA in cervical secretion respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusions: CMV replication in cervical secretion may reflect a uterine CMV infection, involve in CMV vertical transmission, but not increase the risk of missed miscarriage in women with early pregnancy.