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Biography

Barbara Więckowska, Assistant Professor in Social Insurance Department (Warsaw School of Economics), has been graduated from Warsaw School of Eocnomics (Poland) as an expert in Quantity Methods and Information System, phd in Economics. She is specialist in health insurance (public and private), long-term care systems, and actuarial methods in social insurance. Author of nearly 70 articles about social insurance, healthcare insurance and risk management, 10 chapters in books and a monography (“Long-term care insurance”) and “Public long-term care systems in chosen countries” (report prepared for SENATE OF the republic of Poland). In years 2006-2007 she was a member of the group called by Ministry of Health for preparing the proposal of public long-term care insurance bill. In years 2009-2010 she was an expert for the World Bank - preparing report on long-term care benefits financed from different parts of social security system (benefits, beneficiaries, spending). In years 2011-2013 she is the head of Quantitative Methods Department in Strategic Analyses Department of Prime Minister Office of Poland. Since March 2013 she is the head of Strategic Analyses Department of Ministry of Health of Poland.

Abstract

The EU ex ante conditions (maps of healthcare needs) were the trigger for development creation of a prognostic tool to estimate future demand for healthcare in Poland. Th is tool was aimed on (1) recognition the discrepancies in medical treatment between Polish voivodships, (2) to discern dynamics of medical standards between particular cohorts of patients and (3) provide scenario analysis based on assumed changes in medial decision trees. Defined in the Department, the universal instrument is based on the analysis of individual medical data in years 2009-2014 gathered by the public payer (National Healthcare Fund). Th e model allows for evaluation of differences in both accessibility of healthcare services and treatment choice concerning regions as well as cancer types and stages. Observed disparities amount even to 200% for example access to radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. Those inequalities may affect medical decisions – radical mastectomy vs. sublime surgery followed with radiotherapy. The analysis of the distinctions is highly crucial in the context of healthcare policy planning, i.e. (1) designating priority regions for infrastructural investments (e.g. radiotherapy); (2) disseminating new trends in treatment; (3) projecting scenarios that would minimize evident gaps in accessibility of healthcare benefits on the national level. Th is model was applied in 2015 into first healthcare needs maps prepared in Poland concerning oncology and cardiology, and will be further used in maps considering other diseases and health related problems.