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Lynn Ge-Zerbe

Lynn Ge-Zerbe

Boise Thyroid & Endocrinology PC, USA

Title: Evidence that link between EDCs exposure, obesity and insulin resistance/diabetes

Biography

Lynn Ge-Zerbe is a recipient of the Leading Physician of the World and Pinnacle Professional of the Year 2017 award. She is board certified in Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, the Owner of Boise Thyroid & Endocrinology PC, a concierge endocrinology and weight loss practice, the Principle Investigator of Advanced Clinical Research, a Consultant Endocrinologist with RubiconMD and Video Medicine. She has earned her MD at PUMC, MPH of Epidemiology at University of Pittsburgh, Post-doctoral Fellowship in Molecular Medicine at NIH, Residency in Internal Medicine at Leigh Valley Hospital, Penn State University, Fellowship in Endocrinology at Vanderbilt University as well as Age Management Certification by AMMEF. She is passionate in combining east and west medicine to cure and prevent endocrinology disorders.

Abstract

Rising and epidemic rates of obesity in many parts of the world are leading to increased Suffering and economic stress from diverting health care resources to treating a variety of Serious, but preventable, chronic diseases etiologically linked to obesity, particularly type 2 Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. The incidence of diabetes mellitus has tripled Over recent decades, with an estimated 177 million people affected worldwide. It is speculated That by the year 2030 the prevalence of diabetes will increase to 4.4% worldwide (from 2.8% in 2000) with more than 300 million diabetic adults. Regarding the young population, epidemiological studies show an alarming increase in the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2.The WHO has declared excessive weight as one of the top 10 health risks in the world and has estimated that the number of overweight people in the world is now greater than the number of undernourished. The etiology of the obesity epidemic has been partly attributed to alterations in food intake, with the prevalence of a Westernized-style diet characterized by high caloric uptake as well as a lack of physical activity representative of a sedentary lifestyle. However, the mechanisms still remain unclear, and except for a genetic predisposition and lifestyle modifications, scientific research implies the impact of environmental substances in the generative roots of obesity. “obesogens” in reference to molecules that inappropriately regulate lipid metabolism and adipogenesis to promote obesity. The rise in the incidence in obesity matches the rise in the use and distribution of industrial chemicals that may be playing a role in generation of obesity, suggesting that endocrine disruptors (EDCs) may be linked to this epidemic. Based on the links between EDCs and disturbances of reproduction, metabolism, and links to adult dysfunctions and cancer, it is reasonable to propose a connection between EDCs and diabetes as well as prediabetic disturbances. Rising and epidemic rates of obesity in many parts of the world are leading to increased suffering and economic stress from diverting health care resources to treating a variety of serious, but preventable, chronic diseases etiologically linked to obesity, particularly type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. The incidence of diabetes mellitus has tripled Over recent decades, with an estimated 177 million people affected worldwide. It is speculated that by the year 2030 the prevalence of diabetes will increase to 4.4% worldwide (from 2.8% in 2000) with more than 300 million diabetic adults. Regarding the young population, Epidemiological studies show an alarming increase in the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2.􀀀􀀀The WHO has declared excessive weight as one of the top 10 health risks in the world and has estimated that the number of overweight people in the world is now greater than the number of undernourished. The etiology of the obesity epidemic has been partly attributed to alterations in food intake, with the prevalence of a Westernized-style diet characterized by high caloric uptake as well as a lack of physical activity representative of a sedentary lifestyle. However, the mechanisms still remain unclear, and except for a genetic predisposition and lifestyle modifications, scientific research implies the impact of environmental substances in the Generative roots of obesity. “obesogens” in reference to molecules that inappropriately regulate lipid metabolism and adipogenesis to promote obesity. The rise in the incidence in obesity matches the rise in the use and distribution of industrial chemicals that may be playing a role in generation of obesity, suggesting that endocrine disruptors (EDCs) may be linked to this epidemic. Based on the links between EDCs and disturbances of reproduction, metabolism, and links to adult dysfunctions and cancer, it is reasonable to propose a connection between EDCs and diabetes as well as prediabetic disturbances. 

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