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Marta Cecilia Jaramillo Mejia

Marta Cecilia Jaramillo Mejia

ICESI University, Colombia

Title: Exploratory analysis of preventable first day mortality in Colombia

Biography

M C Jaramillo Mejia is a Full Time Faculty Member from 2007 and Coordinator of MA Health Management from 1998 at the Icesi University. He pursued PhD at Universidad de Granada with major in Clinic Medicine and Public Health. He completed MS at Niversidad de Granada in 2009 with major in Preventive Medicine and Public Health and MA at Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud-CES in 1992 with major in Management of Public Health. He also did MA at Universidad EAFIT in 1990 with major in Hospital Management. He received BS degree at Universidad de Antioquia in 1984 with major in Medicine and Surgery.

Abstract

Objective: The goal of this study was to inform public health policy which can reduce Colombia’s estimated infant mortality rate (IMR) by lowering preventable first day mortality (PFDM).

Methods: We combined a time series analysis, using a linear regression method, for examining the trends for 2001–2012 in Colombia’s infant mortality rate per 1000, and in the relative significance of PFDM by cause, with a cross-sectional analysis, using odds ratios and bivariate methods for the year 2012 to study first day mortality (FDM) and PFDM classified by biological, socioeconomic and medical correlates. Then, the study established the major causes of PFDM within major risk categories and groups.

Results: Between 2001 and 2012, the average annual rate of FDM declined by 6.30%, while overall infant mortality only declined by 4.20%. Yet, in 2012, 37.04% of FDM was preventable by using proper pregnancy control (7.00% of total preventable), proper care during childbirth (37.20%) and handling causes associated with late diagnosis and treatment (55.80%).PFDM is primarilysocio-economic phenomenon, even among normal weight and gestational age newborns, which account for 32.73% of PFDM due to improper management of pregnancy and delivery among lower socio-economic and outlying populations, specifically in rural areas and the inferior subsidized social insurance regime.

Conclusion: From efficacy and probable cost effectiveness perspectives, intervention priority should be given to handling babies with normal gestation age and birth-weight, and then to babies with very low gestation age and birth-weight. The use of fetal monitoring and echography methods by all general practitioners should be considered.Objective: The goal of this study was to inform public health policy which can reduce Colombia’s estimated infant mortality rate (IMR) by lowering preventable first day mortality (PFDM).