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Mohammed Gameel

Mohammed Gameel

University of Dammam
Saudi Arabia

Title: Prevention and early diagnosis of Oral Cancer

Biography

Mohammed Gameel is a specialist in Oral Medicine. He has graduated from the College of Dentistry, Liaquat Medical University in 1997. In 2005 he has completed his master\'s degree (MSc) in the specialty of Experimental Oral Medicine from King\'s college – London. He had worked for 5 years in the department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Leicester Royal Infirmary- UK. He had published several papers at international dental journals. currently he is working as a faculty in Dammam University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Cancer of the oral cavity is an important contributor to the overall international cancer burden. Oral cancer can usually be diagnosed at advanced stages. Lack of public awareness as well as absence of prevention and early detection by health care providers, are both believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay. Several studies have attempted to clarify which are the factors behind the diagnostic delay of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and why figures concerning prevention and early detection of Oral Cancer have remained disappointingly constant over recent decades. Lack of awareness in the public of the signs, symptoms, and risk factors of Oral Cancer, as well as a disappointing absence of prevention and early detection by health care providers, are both believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay. It is well established virtually that all Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas are preceded by visible changes in the oral mucosa, usually by way of white (leukoplakia) and red patches (erythroplakia). The prognostic implications of diagnosis and treatment of these early intra-epithelial oral carcinogenesis are highly significant due to high survival rates of early Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have stressed that we can reduce a third of the predicted 15 million cancer cases in the future and more effectively manage another third by planning effective cancer control and screening strategies.