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Praveen Maheshwari

Praveen Maheshwari

University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma city.

Title: Anesthesia for morbid obesity

Biography

 

Dr. Praveen Maheshwari is currently working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, USA, a multispecialty, tertiary care hospital and is the only Level 1 trauma center in the state of Oklahoma. Dr. Maheshwari completed his Anesthesiology residency and Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesiology fellowship at the University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston. He is a Diplomate of American Board of Anesthesiology and National Board of Echocardiography. He has been actively involved with teaching and mentorship of students, residents, and fellows. He has been a member of numerous departmental and hospital committees. He is a question writer for American Society of Anesthesiology and a junior editor for American Board of Anesthesiology. He has been invited to present lectures at regional meetings and have done presentations at national and international meetings. He has numerous peer reviewed publications. He is an editorial board member and is a peer reviewer for several Anesthesiology journals.

 

Abstract

Prevalence of obesity is increasing all over the world. Obese patients are not just large but they also have multiple physiological and anatomical changes associated with obesity. These patients have multiple co morbidities associated with obesity which are independent predictors of poor outcome in the perioperative period. Obesity has its effect on bolus dosing and infusions of medications. Obesity makes these patients at higher risk for anesthesia. So it is very important for anesthesiologists to know about all these changes and how to manage these patient safely and efficiently in the perioperative period.

The aim of my talk is to understand the magnitude of the problem, anatomical and physiological changes of obesity, comorbidities associated with obesity, their effect on anesthesia and their management in the perioperative period.