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Priya Dharshini Loganathan

Priya Dharshini Loganathan

University of Manchester, UK

Title: The comparative outcomes of the use of cage versus non-cage in spinal fusion surgery

Biography

Priya Dharshini Loganathan is currently a Medical student at the University of Manchester in England. She holds a degree in Biomedical Sciences (BSc) previously obtained from Kings College London University. Her passions include Orthopedic Surgery and she aspires to pursue a career in this field. She has presented her work in several national conferences and is currently involved in a few projects related to orthopedics and neurosurgery. She is enthusiastic, motivated and is a keen learner and is looking forward to gaining more knowledge and experience in the field of surgery.

 

Abstract

Aim: The aim of this audit is to compare the outcomes of the use of interbody cage versus no cage in patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery for spinal degenerative conditions.

Method: A retrospective analysis was performed on 86 patients who underwent single level spinal fusion surgery for spinal degenerative diseases from January 2013 to December 2015. These patients were followed up at three months, six months, one year and where possible, two years. Patients were divided into those who had surgery with cage and those who had surgery without cage. Patients 65 years old and above and below 65 were also analyzed separately. Pre and post-operative back pain and leg pain were assessed and compared using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score. Post-operative rate of complications was also recorded.

Results: The results showed that after one-year, back pain had improved in 83% of patients with cage compared to 68% of patients without cage. Leg pain had improved in 79% of patients with cage compared to 66% of patients without cage. In patients under 65, there was a significant improvement in back pain in patients with cage (77%) compared to without cage (29%) [p=0.003]. There was also a significant improvement in leg pain in patients with cage (77%) compared to without cage (43%) [p=0.03].

Conclusion: In conclusion, the use of cage provides a better outcome for patients compared to non-cage, in improving back pain and leg pain, especially for patients below 65 years old.