alexa Pelvic organ prolapse | United-kingdom | PDF | PPT| Case Reports | Symptoms | Treatment

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Pelvic Organ Prolapse

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  • Pelvic organ prolapse

    Pathophysiology

    Pelvic organ prolapse is the abnormal descent or herniation of the pelvic organs from their normal attachment sites or their normal position in the pelvis. The pelvic structures that may be involved include the uterus (uterine prolapse) or vaginal apex (apical vaginal prolapse), anterior vagina (cystocele), or posterior vagina (rectocele). Many parous women may have some degree of prolapse when examined; however, most prolapses are not clinically bothersome without specific pelvic symptoms, and they may not require an intervention.

  • Pelvic organ prolapse

    Disease statistics

    Four hundred fifty-eight responses were received and 398 were completed. For anterior vaginal wall prolapse, anterior colporrhaphy was the procedure of choice in 77% of respondents. With concomitant urodynamic stress incontinence, a Burch was the procedure of choice in 11%, but 79% of respondents would perform a midurethral tape combined with repair. In women with utero-vaginal prolapse the procedure of choice was a vaginal hysterectomy and repair (82%). Twenty-four percent of respondents would operate in women whose family was incomplete. In women with posterior vaginal wall prolapse (PWP), the procedure of choice was posterior colporrhaphy with midline fascial plication (75%). For vault prolapse, 66% of respondents would operate. Thirty-six percent would perform urodynamics prior to surgery. The procedure of choice was an abdominal sacrocolpopexy (38%).

  • Pelvic organ prolapse

    Treatment

    If you do not have any symptoms or if your symptoms are mild, you do not need any special follow-up or treatment beyond having regular checkups. If you have symptoms, prolapse may be treated with or without surgery. Often the first nonsurgical option tried is a pessary. This device is inserted into the vagina to support the pelvic organs. Targeting specific symptoms may be another option. Kegel exercises may be recommended in addition to symptom-related treatment to help strengthen the pelvic floor. Weight loss can decrease pressure in the abdomen and help improve overall health. If your symptoms are severe and disrupt your life, and if nonsurgical treatment options have not helped, you may want to consider surgery.

  • Pelvic organ prolapse

    Research

    The Clinic doctors contribute to the understanding and treatment of pelvic organ prolapse through research and clinical practice. Researchers at Clinic focus on improving the diagnostic procedures and treatments used for all types of pelvic organ prolapse.

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