alexa Acute coronary syndrome | United-states | PDF | PPT| Case Reports | Symptoms | Treatment

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Acute Coronary Syndrome

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  • Acute coronary syndrome

     Acute coronary syndrome is a term used for any condition brought on by sudden, reduced blood flow to the heart. Acute coronary syndrome symptoms may include the type of chest pressure that you feel during a heart attack, or pressure in your chest while you're at rest or doing light physical activity (unstable angina).

    Typical symptoms

    • Chest pain (angina) that feels like burning, pressure or tightness, Pain elsewhere in the body, such as the left upper arm or jaw (referred pain), Nausea, Vomiting, Shortness of breath (dyspnea),heavy sweating (diaphoresis).

  • Acute coronary syndrome

    Tests and diagnosis

    Electrocardiogram (ECG), Blood tests, Echocardiogram, Chest X-ray, Nuclear scan, Coronary angiogram (cardiac catheterization), Computerized tomography (CT) angiogram, Exercise stress test.

  • Acute coronary syndrome

     Statistics

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS), which include unstable angina and myocardial infarction (MI) with or without ST-segment elevation, are life-threatening disorders that remain a source of high morbidity and mortality despite advances in treatment. Nearly 1.5 million hospital discharges involve patients with ACS. According to statistics from the American Heart Association (AHA), approximately 18% of men and 23% of women over the age of 40 will die within 1 year of having an initial recognized MI. The economic burden of ACS is also very high, costing Americans more than $150 billion, according to AHA estimates. Approximately 20% of the ACS patients are rehospitalized within 1 year, and nearly 60% of the costs related to ACS result from rehospitalization. However, the evidence-based therapeutic management of ACS remains suboptimal. An understanding of the drivers of morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with ACS will help in developing strategies to reduce the burden of the disease

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