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Clotting Disorders

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  • Clotting Disorders

     Bleeding disorders are a group of disorders that share the inability to form a proper blood clot. Improper clotting can be caused by defects in blood components such as platelets and/or clotting proteins, also called clotting factors. Symptoms of a bleeding disorder include: Bleeding into joints, muscles and soft tissues, Excessive bruising, Prolonged, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia) The number preson affected by Blood Clotting Disorder is about 85000 people in Germany. The precise number of people affected by Blood clot disorder is 12,000 could be affected (1 to 2 per 1,000) each year in the Belgium. 

  • Clotting Disorders

     4 to 8% of people will die within one month of diagnosis. The novel treatment, detailed for the first time at this week's European Stroke Conference in Hamburg, Germany, was developed for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), a bleed in the brain that causes a clot to form within brain tissue. This clot builds up pressure and leaches inflammatory chemicals that can cause irreversible brain damage, often leading to death or extreme disability. The usual treatments for ICH -- either general supportive care such as blood pressure control and ventilation, which is considered the current standard of care, or invasive surgeries that involve taking off portions of the skull to remove the clot -- have similar mortality rates, ranging from 30 to 80 percent depending on the size of the clot. 

  • Clotting Disorders

     Seeking to improve these mortality rates and surviving ICH patients' quality of life, Daniel Hanley, M.D., professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and his colleagues developed and tested the new treatment on 60 patients at 12 hospitals in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and Germany. They compared their results to those of 11 patients who received only supportive care.

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