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Bunions

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  • Bunions

    Introduction

    A bunion (also referred to as hallux valgus or hallux abducto valgus) is often described as a bump on the side of the big toe. But a bunion is more than that. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the bony framework of the front part of the foot. The big toe leans toward the second toe, rather than pointing straight ahead. This throws the bones out of alignment – producing the bunion’s “bump.” Bunions are a progressive disorder. They begin with a leaning of the big toe, gradually changing the angle of the bones over the years and slowly producing the characteristic bump, which becomes increasingly prominent. Symptoms usually appear at later stages, although some people never have symptoms.

  • Bunions

    Causes

    Bunions are most often caused by an inherited faulty mechanical structure of the foot. It is not the bunion itself that is inherited, but certain foot types that make a person prone to developing a bunion. Although wearing shoes that crowd the toes won’t actually cause bunions, it sometimes makes the deformity get progressively worse. Symptoms may therefore appear sooner.

  • Bunions

    Symptoms

    Symptoms, which occur at the site of the bunion, may include: Pain or soreness, ƒ˜ Inflammation and redness, a burning sensation, possible numbness Symptoms occur most often when wearing shoes that crowd the toes, such as shoes with a tight toe box or high heels. This may explain why women are more likely to have symptoms than men. In addition, spending long periods of time on your feet can aggravate the symptoms of bunions.

  • Bunions

    Non-surgical treatments

    Non-surgical treatments for bunions may include: Wearing shoes that fit and that have adequate toe room. Stretching shoes professionally to make them larger. Putting bunion pads over the bunion to cushion the pain. Avoiding activities that cause pain, such as being on your feet for long periods of time. Taking over-the-counter pain relievers when necessary, such as acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) like ibuprofen. Using ice to provide relief from inflammation and pain. Using custom-made orthotic devices.

  • Bunions

    Surgical treatments

    Surgery might be recommended if non-surgical treatments fail to provide relief, and you are having trouble walking or are in extreme pain. Surgery can be used to return the big toe to its correct anatomical position. During surgery, bones, ligaments, tendons, and nerves are put back into correct order, and the bump is removed. Many bunion correction procedures can be done on a same-day basis. The type of procedure will depend on your physical health, the extent of the foot deformity, your age, and your activity level. The recovery time will depend on which procedure or procedures are performed. Surgery may be recommended to correct a tailor’s bunion, but is unlikely to be recommended for an adolescent bunion.

  • Bunions

    Statistics

    Hospital admission data and mortality statistics from 1999 to 2011 to evaluate the risk of concurrent or subsequent bullous pemphigoid (BP) in a cohort of 2,873,720 individuals with malignant cancers, when compared with a reference cohort. We calculated standardised rate ratios (RRs) based on person-years at risk, comparing the observed and expected numbers of BP cases in the cancer cohort with those in the reference cohort. Overall, the cohort of people with a record of a malignant cancer was not found to be at greater risk of concurrent or subsequent BP than the cohort of people without a record of a malignant cancer (RR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.88–1.04), although elevated risks of BP were found in sub-cohorts of people with either kidney cancer, laryngeal cancer or lymphoid leukaemia. We also similarly analysed the risk of concurrent and subsequent malignant cancers in a cohort of people with a principal diagnosis of BP, and again found no increased risk as compared with the reference cohort (RR 1.00, 95 % CI 0.92–1.09).

 

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