alexa The Safety of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) as a Potential Chemopreventative and Chemotherapeutic Agent in Hepatocarcinogenesis

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The Safety of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) as a Potential Chemopreventative and Chemotherapeutic Agent in Hepatocarcinogenesis

Green tea, made from the unfermented leaves of Camellia sinensis, is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. It is comprised of several polyphenolic compounds (catechins) and can be concentrated into a Green Tea Extract (GTE), which, in turn, is a common ingredient in many dietary supplements. Epigallocatechin-3- gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant and potent catechin contained within GTE, comprising typically ~40% of the total polyphenol content [1]. EGCG has antioxidant, antiviral anticarcinogenic, antimutagenic and anti-inflammatory properties, shown in several preclinical and epidemiologic studies [2-6]. Preclinical data in cell culture and animal models suggest green tea may have a role as a chemopreventative agent for many types of cancer, including Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) [7-11]. Currently, there is a need for more effective treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma which occurs primarily in patients with viral hepatitis and cirrhosis. Given these easily identifiable risk factors, hepatocellular carcinoma is an ideal disease for the development of effective chemopreventative agents. It is estimated that approximately 2% of the US population is infected with HCV; cirrhosis develops in 20% of those infected and HCC develops in 25% of cirrhotics [12]. The majority of patients who present with symptoms associated with HCC do not survive one year [13]. Recent data has demonstrated that successful eradication of HCV in patients with cirrhosis was associated with a reduction in the rate of hepatic decompensation, liver transplant, and liver-related death [14-17]. Although, patients with cirrhosis stand to benefit from HCV therapy the rates of Sustained Virological Response (SVR) are substantially lower in patients with cirrhosis compared with those without cirrhosis [17].

Marzio DHD (2013) Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) as a Potential Chemopreventative and Chemotherapeutic Agents in Hepatocarcinogenesis. J Liver 2:e106.

 
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