alexa Presence of Low Concentrations of Acetic Acid Improves Fermentations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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Presence of Low Concentrations of Acetic Acid Improves Fermentations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Fermentation of sugars released from lignocellulosic biomass (LCMs) is potentially a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. LCMs release fermentable hexose sugars and the currently non-fermentable pentose sugars; ethanol yield from lignocellulosic residues is dependent on the efficient conversion of available sugars to ethanol. One of the challenges facing the commercial application for the conversion of lignocellulosic material to ethanol is the presence of inhibitors released by the breakdown of plant cell walls. Presence of acetic acid is an inevitable side-effect for the release of fermentable sugars from the deconstruction of plant cell walls, increasing temperatures used for the pre-treatment process releases acetic acid from the lignin component of the plant cell wall. Using phenotypic microarray analysis revealed that low concentrations (20 mM) acetic acid augmented metabolic output in yeast for an initial period, however, assays at higher concentrations (>50 mM) reduced metabolic output. Fermentations in the presence of acetic acid where characterized by an improved fermentation efficiency in assays containing 20 mM acetic acid compared with control conditions, however, efficiency was reduced in assays using 50 mM acetic acid. Yeast cells in the presence of 20 mM acetic acid produced less glycerol, and produced more ATP when compared with control conditions or in the presence of 50 mM acetic acid.

 

Citation: Greetham D. (2014) Presence of Low Concentrations of Acetic Acid Improves Fermentations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J Bioprocess Biotech 5:192 doi: 10.4172/2155-9821.1000192

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