alexa Funky light signal from colliding black holes explained

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Funky light signal from colliding black holes explained

Entangled by gravity and destined to merge, two candidate black holes in a distant galaxy appear to be locked in an intricate dance. Researchers using data from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have come up with the most compelling confirmation yet for the existence of these merging black holes and have found new details about their odd cyclical light signal. The candidate black hole duo, called PG 1302-102, was first identified earlier this year using ground-based telescopes. The black holes are the tightest orbiting pair detected so far, with a separation not much bigger than the diameter of our solar system. They are expected to collide and merge in less than a million years, triggering a titanic blast with the power of 100 million supernovae. Researchers are studying this pair to better understand how galaxies and the monstrous black holes at their cores merge — a common occurrence in the early universe. But as common as these events were, they are hard to spot and confirm.

 
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