alexa DNA Forensic Research Future Aricles|Omics Publishing Group|Journal Of Forensic Research

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DNA Forensic Research Future Open Access Articles

DNA forensics or DNA forensic research is a branch of forensic science that focuses on the use of genetic material in criminal investigation to answer questions pertaining to legal situations, including criminal and civil cases. DNA databases are used to identify, track, catalogue, apprehend, and prosecute the perpetrators of crimes. As a future aspect wildlife forensic science may not have attained the profile of human identification, yet the scale of criminal activity related to wildlife is extensive by any measure. Service delivery in the arena of wildlife forensic science is often ad hoc, unco-ordinated and unregulated, yet many of those currently dedicated to wildlife conservation and the protection of endangered species are striving to ensure that the highest standards are met. The genetic markers and software used to evaluate data in wildlife forensic science are more varied than those in human forensic identification and are rarely standardised between species. The progression from Sanger-type sequencing (STS) to next generation sequencing (NGS) will further advance the regenerative sciences, personalized medicine, and forensics. Today, mitochondrial sequencing (mtDNA) is already a validated, widely accepted and utilized tool for helping to resolve complex cases. Advances in this method, through the introduction of next generation systems, are only one way in which these new discoveries will provide additive information to forensic cases. Open access to the scientific literature means the removal of barriers (including price barriers) from accessing scholarly work. There are two parallel “roads” towards open access: Open Access articles and self-archiving. Open Access articles are immediately, freely available on their Web site, a model mostly funded by charges paid by the author (usually through a research grant). The alternative for a researcher is “self-archiving” (i.e., to publish in a traditional journal, where only subscribers have immediate access, but to make the article available on their personal and/or institutional Web sites (including so-called repositories or archives)), which is a practice allowed by many scholarly journals. Open Access raises practical and policy questions for scholars, publishers, funders, and policymakers alike, including what the return on investment is when paying an article processing fee to publish in an Open Access articles, or whether investments into institutional repositories should be made and whether self-archiving should be made mandatory, as contemplated by some funders.
 
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