alexa Forensic Maxillofacial Radiology Open Access Articles|omics Publishing Group|Anaplastology

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Forensic Maxillofacial Radiology Open Access Articles

Forensic maxillofacial radiology is a specialized area of medical imaging utilizing radiological techniques to assist physicians and pathologists in matters pertaining to the law. The importance of maxillofacial radiographic techniques in clinical forensic medicine is widely recognized. The multidisciplinary nature of forensic science necessitates a team approach that includes forensic radiology and forensic odontology and an awareness of the role of the dentist in our criminal justice system. Forensic maxillofacial radiology encompasses the performance, interpretation, and reporting of radiological examinations and procedures connected to the courts and the law. Expertise of the maxillofacial radiologist proves invaluable in forensic consultations and medico legal investigations. Use of radiographs in routine and mass disaster identification has long been in effect, & its application in necro identification is efficient, swift, and relatively easy Forensic maxillofacial radiology depended almost exclusively on the x-ray and the static image captured on the radiograph. The newer modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are only gradually being added to the forensic arsenal. Open access to the scientific literature means the removal of barriers (including price barriers) from accessing scholarly work. There are two parallel “roads” towards open access: Open Access articles and self-archiving. Open Access articles are immediately, freely available on their Web site, a model mostly funded by charges paid by the author (usually through a research grant). The alternative for a researcher is “self-archiving” (i.e., to publish in a traditional journal, where only subscribers have immediate access, but to make the article available on their personal and/or institutional Web sites (including so-called repositories or archives)), which is a practice allowed by many scholarly journals. Open Access raises practical and policy questions for scholars, publishers, funders, and policymakers alike, including what the return on investment is when paying an article processing fee to publish in an Open Access articles, or whether investments into institutional repositories should be made and whether self-archiving should be made mandatory, as contemplated by some funders.
 
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