alexa Hair Loss Impact Factor|OMICS International|Hair: Therapy And Transplantation

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Hair Loss Impact Factor

Hair loss will affect just your scalp or your entire body. It could be due to heredity, certain medications or an underlying medical condition. Men, women and children could possible experience hair loss. Baldness typically refers to excessive hair loss from your scalp. Hair loss will appear in many different ways, depending on the problem that's causing it. It could come on suddenly or gradually and affect just your scalp or your whole body. Hair loss is temporary or permanent at times. The signs and symptoms of hair loss are gradual thinning on top of head, circular or patchy bald spots, sudden loosening of hair and full-body hair loss. Some conditions and medical treatments, such as chemotherapy for cancer, will result in the loss of hair all over your body. The hair usually grows back after treatment ends. The causes of hair loss are due to hormonal imbalance, which causes temporary hair loss. Temporary hair loss could be due to pregnancy, childbirth, discontinuation of birth control pills or the onset of menopause. Some medical conditions like thyroid problems, alopecia areata, scalp infections and other skin disorders The impact factor of journal provides quantitative assessment tool for grading, evaluating, sorting and comparing journals of similar kind. It reflects the average number of citations to recent articles published in science and social science journals in a particular year or period, and is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field. It is first devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information. The impact factor of a journal is evaluated by dividing the number of current year citations to the source items published in that journal during the previous two years.
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Last date updated on June, 2014

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