alexa Fothergill's Disease | OMICS International | Internal Medicine Open Access

OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Fothergill's Disease

Fothergill's Disease (FD) has been referred in the medical literature for centuries. References to unilateral facial pain causing facial spasms can be seen in the writings of Aretaeus of Cappadocia in the 2nd century A.D. and those of the Arab physician Jujani in the 11th century A.D. The international Association for the study of pain defined Fothergill's Disease as sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing, recurrent pains in the distribution of one or more branches of the fifth cranial nerve. People often called it as Tic douloureux, Trifacial neuralgia, or Trigeminal Neuralgia. Medical Science sometimes calls FD the worst pain known to mankind and the suicide disorder because of the significant numbers of people taking their own lives when they cannot find effective treatments. The pain involves the second (maxillary) or third (mandible) divisions more often than the first (ophthalmic); it rarely occur bilaterally and never simultaneously on each side, occasionally more than one division is involved. Paroxysmal attack last for few seconds to minutes. Internal Medicine Open Access, an official journal of OMICS International publishes all the articles related to Fothergill's Disease. The journal is subjecting all the received manuscripts to a strict peer review process. The articles published in the journal are Open Access i.e, freely accessible to readers all around the world. Internal Medicine Open Access is maintaining the quality of articles through its strict peer review process.
  • Share this page
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • Blogger

Last date updated on July, 2014

Top