alexa Rice Milling|omicsgroup|rice Research: Open Access

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Rice Milling

The basic objective of a rice milling system is to remove the husk and the bran layers, and produce an edible, white rice kernel that is sufficiently milled and free of impurities. Milling is a crucial step in post-production of rice. A rice milling system is a simple one or two step process, or a multi stage process. In a one-step milling process, husk and bran removal are done in one pass and milled or white rice is produced directly out of paddy. In a two-step process, removing husk and removing bran are done separately, and brown rice is produced as an intermediate product. In multistage milling, rice will undergo a number of different processing steps. Depending on weather the paddy is milled in the village for local consumption or for the marketing rice milling systems can be classified into the categories village rice mills and commercial mills. Journal impact factor is an index or a criteria devised by Eugene Garfield to categorize journals based on their citations. Impact factor is considered as a putative marker to indicate the journal quality. But the recent policies being adopted to improve the impact factor is becoming a topic of controversies today. This current scenario questions the reliability of impact factor. The citation index cannot be considered to determine the scientific quality of an article because the technicalities are not considering the scientific quality. Knowing or reading an article is not enough to determine their quality validating the content and approving the findings and revalidating the facts is vital in scientific research. It is highly impossible to do a scholar check in each and every article to detect fraudulent or unsubstantial citations.
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Last date updated on July, 2014

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