alexa Dementia Open Access Articles|OMICS International|Journal Of Sleep Disorders And Therapy

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Dementia Open Access Articles

Dementia is often accompanied by various types of sleep disorders associated with neurotransmission disturbances caused by cortical and subcortical atrophy in different aspects and areas, depending on the underlying disease. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), that is one of the most common causes of dementia, sleep disorder is observed in about 28% of the patients; when stratified by severity, it is observed in about 25% of those with mild to moderate AD and in 50% of those with severe AD. When compared with normal elderly subjects, the main sleep of AD patients is characterized by intermittent sleep (increased frequency and wake duration after sleep onset (WASO)) and a decrease in deep sleep and REM sleep. Also observed are an increased ratio of daytime sleep relative to the total daily sleep duration and increased percentage of deep sleep and REM sleep in the daytime nap. the sleep disorders which cannot sleep at the time when oneself or society wanted are said the Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorder (CRSD).CRSD in AD patients progresses with increasing disease stage and it is also associated with poor quality sleep, daytime hypersomnia, night delirium, and sundowning syndrome, a condition characterized by excitement occurring in the evening hours. Open access to the scientific literature means the removal of barriers (including price barriers) from accessing scholarly work. There are two parallel “roads” towards open access: Open Access articles and self-archiving. Open Access articles are immediately, freely available on their Web site, a model mostly funded by charges paid by the author (usually through a research grant). The alternative for a researcher is “self-archiving” (i.e., to publish in a traditional journal, where only subscribers have immediate access, but to make the article available on their personal and/or institutional Web sites (including so-called repositories or archives)), which is a practice allowed by many scholarly journals.
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Last date updated on September, 2014

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