alexa

GET THE APP

Anti-Black Punitive Traditions in Early American Policing | OMICS International| Abstract
ISSN: 2169-0170

Journal of Civil & Legal Sciences
Open Access

Our Group organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)
  • Mini Review   
  • J Civil Legal Sci,
  • DOI: 10.4172/2169-0170.1000262

Anti-Black Punitive Traditions in Early American Policing

DeAnza A Cook*
Teaching Fellow and Course Development Fellow for the History Department and History & Literature Program, University of Harvard, United States
*Corresponding Author : DeAnza A Cook, Teaching Fellow and Course Development Fellow for the History Department and History & Literature Program, University of Harvard, United States, Tel: 4345096137, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Mar 14, 2021 / Accepted Date: Mar 21, 2021 / Published Date: Apr 03, 2021

Abstract

From the police precinct to the prison plantation, historians of the American Carceral State have scrutinized “the habitual surveillance and incapacitation of racialized individuals and communities” as a defining feature of American criminal law enforcement. This abridged historical review expounds upon the central thesis of “The Mass Criminalization of Black Americans: A Historical Overview” and examines the development of anti-black punitive traditions in American policing that first surfaced in the era of slavery and settler colonization. I argue that colonial police patrols established in the 17th century were foundational antecedents of anti-black order maintenance functions ultimately incorporated by modern municipal police forces throughout the 19th century. By tracing the emergence of town watches and city guards from Boston to New Orleans, this review underscores the evolution of urban police practices originally deployed for the purpose of controlling “savages” and “slaves” throughout revolutionary and antebellum America.

Keywords: Precinct, Colonization, Savages and slaves

Citation: Cook DA (2021) Anti-Black Punitive Traditions in Early American Policing. J Civil Legal Sci 10: 262. Doi: 10.4172/2169-0170.1000262

Copyright: © 2021 Cook DA. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Select your language of interest to view the total content in your interested language

Post Your Comment Citation
Share This Article
Article Usage
  • Total views: 246
  • [From(publication date): 0-0 - Sep 27, 2021]
  • Breakdown by view type
  • HTML page views: 89
  • PDF downloads: 157
Top