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High Risk of Transfusion-Transmitted Malaria (TTM) from Student Blood Donors Living in the Town of Douala, Cameroon | OMICS International| Abstract
2476-213X

Journal of Clinical Infectious Diseases & Practice
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  • Research Article   
  • J Clin Infect Dis Pract 2016, Vol 1(1): 108
  • DOI: 10.4172/2476-213X.1000108

High Risk of Transfusion-Transmitted Malaria (TTM) from Student Blood Donors Living in the Town of Douala, Cameroon

Martin Luther Koanga Mogtomo1*, Loick Pradel Kojom Foko2, Eliane Vanessa Assokom Okoubalimba1, Elisee Embolo Enyegue1 and Annie Rosalie Ngono Ngane1
1Research Unit of Molecular and Cell Biology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Cameroon
2Research Unit of Parasitology and Entomology, Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon
*Corresponding Author : Martin Luther Koanga Mogtomo, Research unit of Molecular and Cell Biology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The University of Douala, P.O. Box 24157, Douala, Cameroon, Tel: (+237) 699 50 34 44/ 677 44 16 57, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Jul 06, 2016 / Accepted Date: Jul 30, 2016 / Published Date: Aug 04, 2016

Abstract

Objective: Despite its contribution in managing and saving human lives, blood transfusion nonetheless can represent one obvious hazard in the transmission of many infectious diseases, among which malaria. This study aimed at determining the risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM) from student donors.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in January 2015 in students living in the town of Douala, Cameroon. One hundred and seventy nine (179) students aged between 18 and 32 years were included in the study and their blood tested for the presence of malaria parasites using thick blood films. A questionnaire form was administered to each participant for documenting socio demographical, clinical and malaria-related data.

Results: The prevalence of malaria infection among donors was 27.54%. Overall prevalence of the asymptomatic malaria was 10.17% which accounted for 47.36% of all cases of malaria infection. Malaria prevalence was higher in males compared to their female counterparts (29.85%), in those aged 21-25 years old (32.55%) and who were not using insecticide-treated bed nets (26.31%). Mean parasite density was the highest in males, 21-25 years old and bed nets users with 139 ± 346 parasites/μl, 132 ± 341 parasites/μl and 156 ± 476 parasites/μl respectively. None of the factors tested were found to be associated with an increased risk of malaria infection (pvalue> 0.05).

Conclusion: This study has highlighted a potential high risk of TTM from student donors. In many endemic areas malaria diagnosis is overlooked thus increasing the risk of TTM and constraining its appraisal. This study fills the gaps a little in field of blood transfusion safety in our setting and we expect it will be helpful to adequately define policies in order to undermine the misperceptions about TTM such as screening malaria parasite and selection of potential donors in blood banks prior to the transfusion.

Keywords: Malaria; Transfusion-Transmitted malaria; risk; asymptomatic carriage; diagnosis; blood donation; Douala

Citation: Mogtomo MLK, Foko LPK, Okoubalimba EVA, Enyegue EE and Ngane ARN (2016) High Risk of Transfusion-Transmitted Malaria (TTM) from Student Blood Donors Living in the Town of Douala, Cameroon. J Clin Infect Dis Pract 1: 108. Doi: 10.4172/2476-213X.1000108

Copyright: © 2016 Mogtomo MLK et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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