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Music and Emotions of Teenagers in Benin | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2375-4494

Journal of Child and Adolescent Behavior
Open Access

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Research Article

Music and Emotions of Teenagers in Benin

Fiossi-Kpadonou E1,2, Sessou DV1, Kpadonou GT1,3* and Agossou T4

1Faculty of Health Sciences (FSS), University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin

2Mother-Child-Adolescent mental healthcare service (SMEA) of the Mother and Child University Hospital Center, Lagune (CHU- MEL) Cotonou, Benin

3Physical and Rehabilitation medicine Service, CNHU-HKM, Cotonou, Benin

4Pedopsychiatrist, Teacher Emeritus, Cotonou, Benin

*Corresponding Author:
Toussaint G. Kpadonou
Faculty of Health Sciences (FSS)
University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin
Tel: 00 229 97588926
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: October 21, 2016; Accepted Date: November 23, 2016; Published Date: November 30, 2016

Citation: Fiossi-Kpadonou E, Sessou DV, Kpadonou GT, Agossou T (2016) Music and Emotions of Teenagers in Benin. J Child Adolesc Behav 4:323. doi: 10.4172/2375-4494.1000323

Copyright: © 2016 Fiossi-Kpadonou E, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Music is an essential communication channel with each age group and each period with its type and style of music. Objective: To analyze emotions associated with the influence of music on teenagers in order to ameliorate their mental healthcare using this channel. Method: it was a prospective cross-sectional study with a descriptive and analytical scope which involved 269 teenagers of secondary and university schools and professional training centers in southern Benin. The sampling was based on a self-questionnaire administered within two months (May and June) 2011. Data were processed and analyzed using SPSS. The threshold of significance was fixed at 5%. Results: 49.4% of the respondents listened to music several times a day, either individually (27.5%); in groups (4.8%); or both (67.7%). Listening sounded a positive emotional note (49.2%) and a negative emotional note in times of anxiety, anger, sadness, hopelessness and loneliness (46.4%). Music procured "pleasure or joyous moments", gave "a sensation of wellbeing, relief and relaxation", stimulated a sense of "motivation", "inspiration", and enabled "distraction and liberation"; it "gave life". Traditional music enabled re-inspiration. Zouk was said to be good for sexual arousal, religious music and slows help to dispel sadness, stress and anxiety. The brands that are mostly listened to in groups included "coupé-décalé", rap, hip-hop, reggae, R and B, techno, salsa, jazz, rumba and raga. Lullabies are hummed during moments of hopelessness, lack of affection, sadness, anger and anxiety. Personal experiences of listening to music are influenced by sex (p=0.004). Conclusion: music was a privileged language for teenagers as they waded through this tumultuous period of their lives, a period full of emotions that were difficult to express and to manage. It is an efficient tool that requires consideration as far as care is concerned.

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