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Environmental Effects of Logging Include Deforestation
ISSN: 2573-458X

Environment Pollution and Climate Change
Open Access

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  • Commentry   
  • Environ Pollut Climate Change, Vol 5(6)
  • DOI: 10.4172/2573-458X.1000225

Environmental Effects of Logging Include Deforestation

Johng Marco*
*Corresponding Author: Johng Marco, Department of Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Republic of Korea

Commentary

The environmental effects of illegal logging include deforestation, the loss of biodiversity and also the emission of greenhouse gases. Illegal logging has contributed to conflicts with indigenous and native populations, violence, human rights abuses, corruption, funding of armed conflicts and also the worsening of poverty. we'll find that logging is described because the commercial felling of trees to form other products. Deforestation, on the opposite hand, is defined because the complete removal of the forest and every one of its associated life forms. For the foremost part, act is guilty for deforestation, though natural disasters do play a task. Logging, or reducing trees in a very forest to reap timber for wood, products or fuel, may be a primary driver of deforestation. Logging affects the environment in several ways. Removal of trees alters species composition, the structure of the forest, and may cause nutrient depletion [1].

The loss of trees and other vegetation can cause temperature change, desertification, eating away, fewer crops, flooding, increased greenhouse gases within the atmosphere, and a number of problems for indigenous people. Illegal logging drives deforestation, biodiversity loss and temperature change. It can deprive forest communities of livelihoods, and also the natural resources they depend on, and result in human rights violations, unrest and violence. The environmental effects of illegal logging include deforestation, the loss of biodiversity and therefore the emission of greenhouse gases. Illegal logging has contributed to conflicts with indigenous and native populations, violence, human rights abuses, corruption, funding of armed conflicts and also the worsening of poverty [2]. Logging also alters the habitat of wildlife by changing or destroying nesting, feeding and breeding sites. in line with Myers forest disturbance affects animal populations even over plant species, as animals often require large ranges. Many animal species depend on trees for his or her food sources and shelter. Logging causes ecosystem fragmentation.

Habitats are dig fragments, affecting food availability, migration patterns and shelter. The term 'logging' is sometimes accustomed denote silviculture activities or forest management. It also encourages the expansion and development of recent species of trees and could be a vital practice because it provides the sustained production of timber. These two components are essential for the general growth of the trees. Cutting trees may end up within the loss of habitat for animal species, which might harm ecosystems. per National Geographic, "70 percent of Earth's land animals and plants sleep in forests, and lots of cannot survive the deforestation that destroys their homes. Deforestation may be a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing U.S. and international forest and climate protection initiatives. AD Partners convenes public, private and civil society leaders to inspire decision makers to push sustainable agricultural practices that are freed from deforestation [3].

References

1. Kagawa A, Leavitt SW, (2010) "Stable carbon isotopes of tree rings as a tool to pinpoint the geographic origin of timber". Journal of Wood Science. 56: 175–83.

2. Tony W, (2007) The Persistence of Subsistence Agriculture, Lexington Books.

3. Fordaq SA (2014) Australia: Illegal Logging Prohibition Regulat

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