alexa Poly Pearls in the Stomach

ISSN:2167-7964

OMICS Journal of Radiology

  • Image Article   
  • OMICS J Radiol 2018, Vol 7(1): 1
  • DOI: 10.4172/2167-7964.1000290

Poly Pearls in the Stomach

Chia-Ying L1, Ming-Chun L1 and Lin G2*
1College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
2Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Clinical Phenome Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
*Corresponding Author: Lin G, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Clinical Phenome Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University, Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan, Tel: +88633281200, Fax: +88633281200, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Feb 03, 2018 / Accepted Date: Feb 06, 2018 / Published Date: Feb 09, 2018

Keywords: Pearls; Tapioca; Bubble tea

Clinical Description

A 23-year-old man bumped into a car while riding a scooter, and suffered from multiple abrasion wounds. At our emergency room, his complaint right abdominal pain, but denied loss of consciousness after the accident. He had neither medical history nor congenital disease. Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) showed mild free fluid accumulation in the Morrison pouch. Computed Tomography (CT) scan demonstrated accumulation of small round hyperdensities in a distended saccular structure in the upper abdomen (Figure 1A). He recalled that he had gulped down “bubble tea”, which was made with tapioca particles, sugar and water (Figure 1B). The tapioca particles exhibited a CT density between 46-221 Hounsfield units, mainly in the stomach, and few of them could be traced down in the duodenum and jejunum. His condition was stable under conservative treatment and was discharged four days later.

radiology-Axial-computed-tomography

Figure 1A: Axial computed tomography (CT) demonstrated accumulation of small round hyperdensities in a distended saccular structure in the upper abdomen. The tapioca particles exhibited a CT density between 46-221 Hounsfield units, and few of them could be traced down in the duodenum and jejunum.

radiology-tapioca-particles

Figure 1B: “Bubble tea” drink made with tapioca particles (arrows), sugar, and water.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest. The Institutional Review Board approved this case report. The patient’s identity has been kept confidential.

Citation: Chia-Ying L, Ming-Chun L, Lin G (2018) Poly Pearls in the Stomach. OMICS J Radiol 7: 290. Doi: 10.4172/2167-7964.1000290

Copyright: ©2018 Chia-Ying L, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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