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Antibiotic Resistance in Streptococcus pneumonia: A Disaster in the making | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2161-1165

Epidemiology: Open Access
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Editorial

Antibiotic Resistance in Streptococcus pneumonia: A Disaster in the making

Mirza Shaper*

Division of Epidemiology, University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, USA

*Corresponding Author:
Dr. Mirza Shaper
Division of Epidemiology
University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, USA
Tel: 956-882-1560
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: July 22, 2011; Accepted date: July 24, 2011; Published date: July 28, 2011

Citation: Shaper M (2011) Antibiotic Resistance in Streptococcus pneumonia: A Disaster in the making. Epidemiol 1:102e. doi:10.4172/2161-1165.1000102e

Copyright: © 2011 Shaper M. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Sir William Osler once called S. pneumoniae "the Captain of the men of death". Streptococcus pneumonia, the most common cause of community acquired pneumoniae, otitis media and meningitis is the sixth leading cause of death in the world. Children under the age of 5, elderly individuals and individuals with co-morbidities such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and immuncompromised individuals are at the highest risk of acquiring pneumococcal infections. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates between 11 and 18 million cases of pneumococcal infection in children under the age of 5 and approximately 826,000 deaths globally. Pneumococcal infections account for approximately 11% of all deaths that occur in children under the age of 5 yrs. S. pneumoniae is also the most frequent cause of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) accounting for 20-60% cases of CAP and 11-20% of CAP associated mortality.

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