alexa

GET THE APP

Evaluation of Superior Mesenteric Artery (SMA) and Celiac Artery (CA) Blood Flow Pattern in Preterm Infants and Factors Influencing the Blood Flow | OMICS International| Abstract
ISSN: 2572-4983

Neonatal and Pediatric Medicine
Open Access

Our Group organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)
  • Research Article   
  • Neonat Pediatr Med 2019, Vol 5(1): 174
  • DOI: 10.4172/2572-4983.1000174

Evaluation of Superior Mesenteric Artery (SMA) and Celiac Artery (CA) Blood Flow Pattern in Preterm Infants and Factors Influencing the Blood Flow

Nitin Ramdas Unde1*, Khaled Mahmoud El-Atawi1, Mahmoud Saleh Elhalik2 and Arif Moinuddin Faquih1
1Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Latifa Women and Children Hospital, Dubai, UAE
2Head of Pediatric Department, Consultant Neonatologist, Latifa Women and Children Hospital, Dubai, UAE
*Corresponding Author : Nitin Ramdas Unde, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Latifa Women and Children Hospital, Oud Metha Road, Al Jaddaf Dubai, UAE, Tel: +971565909700, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Nov 22, 2018 / Accepted Date: Dec 11, 2018 / Published Date: Jan 01, 2019

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the blood flow velocity (BFV) in superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) in first 2 days of life in preterm (less than 32 week and less than 1 kg) and to study the influence of various factors on the blood flow velocities in the same population.

Methods: 50 preterm less than 32 week with birth weight less than 1 kg was included in the prospective observation study. Assessment of SMA and CA blood flow velocities (PSV: peak systolic velocity, EDV: end diastolic velocity, TAV: time average velocity) was done twice at 24 h (20-30) and at 48 h (40-54). Blood flow indices (resistive index; RI, pulsatile index; PI) was calculated using the formula. Simultaneously data for various factors influencing the blood flow in SMA and CA was collected in the similar population.

Results: SMA BFV increases from 24 h after birth and continue to rise thereafter in first 2 days. Significant increase in SMA EDV (6.77 ± 2.38 vs. 8.74 ± 4.42) and SMA PSV (37.16 ± 10.64 vs. 42.72 ± 14.66) was noted postnatally. Increase in SMA TAV was also observed. CA BFV showed negative trend from 24 h after birth with reduction of all velocities (PSV, EDV and TAV). CA TAV showed significant reduction at 48 h of age compared to 24 h (28.22 ± 9.81 vs. 25.00 ± 8.07). Significant PDA was associated with attenuated BFV in both the SMA and CA on both the occasions. Other factors associated with adverse blood flow velocities were blood transfusion and anemia. Trophic feeding was associated with increase blood flow velocities in both SMA and CA.

Conclusion: Postnatally increase in SMA BFV was noted in first 2 days of life indicating improved intestinal perfusion and opposite trend in CA BFV. Significant PDA was associated with abnormal blood flow velocities in both SMA and CA.

Keywords: Blood Flow Velocity (Bfv); Superior Mesenteric Artery (Sma); Celiac Artery (Ca); Hemodynamically Significant Patent Ductus Arteriosus (Hspda)

Citation: Unde NR, El-Atawi KM, Elhalik MS, Faquih AM (2019) Evaluation of Superior Mesenteric Artery (SMA) and Celiac Artery (CA) Blood Flow Pattern in Preterm Infants and Factors Influencing the Blood Flow. Neonat Pediatr Med 5: 174. Doi: 10.4172/2572-4983.1000174

Copyright: © 2018 Unde NR, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Top