alexa How Well Do Adolescents Know Their Local Parks? Test-Retest Reliability and Validity of an Adolescent Self-Report Park Survey for Diverse Low-Income Urban Neighborhoods | Abstract
ISSN: 2375-4494

Journal of Child and Adolescent Behavior
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Research Article

How Well Do Adolescents Know Their Local Parks? Test-Retest Reliability and Validity of an Adolescent Self-Report Park Survey for Diverse Low-Income Urban Neighborhoods

Sandy Slater1*Kelsie Full2Marian Fitzgibbon3Myron F Floyd4

1Department of Health Policy and Administration, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

2University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

3Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

4Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, North Carolina State University, USA

*Corresponding Author:
Sandy Slater
Department of Health Policy and Administration
School of Public Health
University of Illinois at Chicago
1747 W. Roosevelt Road, M/C 275
Room 558, Chicago, IL 60608, USA
Tel: 312-413-0475
Fax: 312-355-2801
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: May 07, 2013; Accepted Date: July 12, 2013; Published Date: July 15, 2013

Citation: Slater S, Full K, Fitzgibbon M, Floyd MF (2013) How Well Do Adolescents Know Their Local Parks? Test-Retest Reliability and Validity of an Adolescent Self-Report Park Survey for Diverse Low-Income Urban Neighborhoods. J Child Adolesc Behav 1:108. doi:10.4172/2375-4494.1000108

Copyright: © 2013 Slater S, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Background: The study aimed to develop a self-report park survey tailored to underserved populations at risk of obesity (low income urban youth), and to determine the feasibility and reliability of collecting park measures from memory. Methods: Sixth through 8th grade students were recruited from two purposively selected urban schools (one predominantly African American and the other predominantly Latino with high proportions of lower-income students). A total of 103 (47 male) students participated in the test-retest reliability of the survey. Research staff conducted field audits of neighborhood parks/physical activity settings (N=21) to determine concurrent validity of the self-report surveys. Results: Overall, youth participants had good reliability on two-thirds of the survey measures. Validity results suggest students had poor percent agreement on the majority of park/physical activity setting features. Although both schools had similar overall validity results, the only common validated feature was playgrounds. Conclusions: Results suggest most measures were understood by participants, but overall youth could not validly report what physical activity features are accessible to them from memory. This suggests that if youth do not know the features that exist in their neighborhood, then they are probably not utilizing them for physical activity.

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