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Importance of Genomic Profiling: Applications for Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Prognosis and Prediction of Response | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2161-0681

Journal of Clinical & Experimental Pathology
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Special Issue Article

Importance of Genomic Profiling: Applications for Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Prognosis and Prediction of Response

Yolanda Jerez Gilarranz*

Medical Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain

*Corresponding Author:
Yolanda Jerez Gilarranz
Medical Oncology
Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón
Madrid, Spain
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: November 17, 2011; Accepted date: April 20, 2012; Published date: April 23, 2012

Citation: Gilarranz YJ (2012) Importance of Genomic Profiling: Applications for Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Prognosis and Prediction of Response. J Clin Exp Pathol S1:003. doi:10.4172/2161-0681.S1-003

Copyright: © 2012 Gilarranz YJ. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Breast cancer accounts for 30% of all tumors. Current incidence rates are high, and the estimated lifetime risk for women is 12.5% (i.e., 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with cancer of the breast during their lifetime). Classically, breast cancer has been divided into two subgroups, which have different outcomes and prognoses depending on their response to hormone therapy (sensitive and insensitive). Other traditional prognostic markers include axillary lymph node status, tumor size, nuclear grade and histological grade. In the last decade, new technologies for analyzing the genomic profiles of human tumors have substantially improved our knowledge of the molecular classification of breast cancer. This development improves diagnostic accuracy and enhances the ability to individualize therapy for breast cancer, thereby leading to direct implications for patient management.

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