alexa Live Cell Analysis: When Electric Detection Interfaces Microfluidics | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2153-0777

Journal of Bioengineering and Bioelectronics
Open Access

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Review Article

Live Cell Analysis: When Electric Detection Interfaces Microfluidics

Nathalie Picollet-D’hahan*
CEA, DSV, IRTSV, Biomics laboratory. 17 rue des Martyrs. 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09, France In SERM U1038;VJF, Grenoble, France
Corresponding Author : Dr. Nathalie Picollet-D’hahan, CEA, DSV, IRTSV
Biomics laboratory.
17 rue des Martyrs.
38054 Grenoble Cedex 09, France
Tel: +33 438786778
Fax: +33 438785917
E-mail: [email protected]
Received August 29, 2010; Accepted September 23, 2011; Published October 29, 2011
Citation: Picollet-D'hahan N (2011) Live Cell Analysis: When Electric Detection Interfaces Microfluidics. J Biochip Tissue chip S1:001. doi:10.4172/2153-0777.S1-001
Copyright: © 2011 Picollet-D'hahan N. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

This literature review describes the advantages of microfluidics when combined with electric methods in live cell analysis. We focus on dielectric spectroscopy of individual cells and classify methods according to the type of information they provide on the biological material examined and how this information can be used to guide the development of biosensors. We then describe methods for the direct measurement of electrophysiological activity of single cells through either integrated lab-on-chip patch clamp devices or communicating cellular networks with multi-electrode arrays. Lastly, we present our views on how a multimodal approach addresses the need for and challenge of tracking spatial and temporal determinants of cell activity at the cellular level.

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