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Role of Neck Dissection in Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Treated with Primary Chemoradiotherapy | OMICS International| Abstract
ISSN: 2161-119X

Otolaryngology: Open Access
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  • Research Article   
  • Otolaryngol (Sunnyvale) 2016, Vol 6(1): 220
  • DOI: 10.4172/2161-119X.1000220

Role of Neck Dissection in Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Treated with Primary Chemoradiotherapy

Martin M, García J*, Lopez M, Hinojar A, Manzanares R, Fernandez L, Prada J and Cerezo L
Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Madrid, , Spain
*Corresponding Author : García J, Otolaryngologist, Hospital Universitario De La Princesa, Madrid, Spain, Tel: +34916670743, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Dec 04, 2015 / Accepted Date: Jan 18, 2016 / Published Date: Feb 17, 2016

Abstract

1.1. Introduction: Planned neck dissection after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer is controversial. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of neck dissection on the long-term locoregional control and survival of patients with stage III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after primary CRT.
1.2. Methods/Patients: We retrospectively analysed locoregional control, locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS), and overall survival (OS) in 67 patients with locally-advanced HNSCC treated with exclusive CRT at our department between January 1998 and December 2013.
1.3. Results: Complete clinical response was achieved in 36 of 67 patients (53.7%), partial response > 50% in 17 pts (25.4%), stable disease in 3 (4.5%); 9 patients (13.4%) developed disease progression during treatment. At a median follow-up of 35 months, LRFS and OS were 100% in patients with complete response and neck dissection versus 77.9% and 79.8%, respectively, in patients who did not undergo neck dissection (p = ns). The only independent prognostic factor for locoregional control was complete response to CRT.
1.4. Conclusions: Patients who achieve a complete clinical response to CRT have a very low risk of isolated neck recurrence and, therefore, planned neck dissection may not be justified in such cases. Clinical and radiographic identification of patients with residual disease following CRT who could benefit from neck dissection remains challenging.

Keywords: Carcinoma, Squamous cell of head and neck, Chemoradiotherapy, Neck dissection, Neoplasm recurrence local

Citation: Martin M, García J, Lopez M, Hinojar A, Manzanares R, et al. (2016) Role of Neck Dissection in Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Treated with Primary Chemoradiotherapy. Otolaryngology 6:220. Doi: 10.4172/2161-119X.1000220

Copyright: © 2016 Martin M, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Review summary

  1. Amari
    Posted on Oct 26 2016 at 7:52 pm
    The presented research article narrates about the evaluation of the influence of neck dissection on the long-term locoregional control and survival of patients with stage III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after primary CRT. The article gives new definition to the integration of newer and more sophisticated imaging techniques. This work finds application in the medical field.
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