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Social Support and the Health of Homeless Individuals
ISSN: 1522-4821

International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience
Open Access

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  • Short Communication   
  • Int J Emerg Ment Health, Vol 23(4): 471

Social Support and the Health of Homeless Individuals

Nayani Sharma

Homeless people usually suffer from serious health issues. It’s been argued that the homeless are socially isolated; with low levels of social support and social functioning, which this lack of social resources contributes to their unhealthiness (Hwang et al., 2013). These observations recommend the requirement to additional explore the link between social networks, social support, and health among persons United Nations agency are homeless. These findings highlight a requirement for additional services that encourage the combination of homeless people into social networks and therefore the building of specific forms of social support at intervals networks, additionally to additional analysis into social support and different social discourse factors (e.g., social capital) and their influence on the health of homeless people.

Homelessness may be a growing drawback in various urban centres round the world. Homeless people often suffer from serious health issues, together with mental state, abuse, and infectious and chronic diseases.1 it's been argued that homeless people are usually socially isolated, with low levels of social support and social functioning, which this lack of social resources contributes to their unhealthiness (Khandor et al., 2007). These observations recommend the requirement to additional explore the link between social networks, social support, and health among persons United Nations agency are homeless so as to develop effective interventions with that to make these social resources associated with health. Social networks are ordinarily outlined as “a set of nodes that are tied by one or additional specific forms of relations between them.”

Half-dozen Embeddedness in social networks will influence health through processes of social influence and social engagement and therefore the provision of access to social support and different resources. Seven Social support derived from social networks is hypothesized to have an effect on health in numerous ways that (Gory et al., 1991). Social support will buffer the consequences of nerve-racking life events that otherwise would negatively have an effect on physical and psychological state. What is more, social support will produce positive emotive states, and confirmatory relationships will give people with access to positive social influence that may encourage healthy behaviors. various studies have found that social support has protecting effects on physical health outcomes, like upset and mortality, and psychological state outcomes, like depression and anxiety. Social support may be a four-dimensional construct that has generally been measured in 3 ways (Fischer et al., 1986): (1) measures of social integration through the scale of the social network; (2) measures of received support that assess the extent of support received from social network ties (received/behavioral social support); Associate in Nursing (3) measures of perceived support that assess an individual’s perceptions of the supply of support from social network ties (perceived/cognitive social support). Received and perceived social support will every incorporates totally different elements, like emotional support (the expression of positive have an effect on and sympathetic understanding), resource (the provision of monetary recommendation or aid), and instrumental support (tangible, material, or activity assistance) eight. There’s increasing interest within the influence of social support on health outcomes among deprived teams, and there's a modest body of analysis that has explored the consequences of social support on health among individuals experiencing status nine (Solarz & Bogat, 1990). This analysis has found that social support is related to lower rates of psychological state issues, like depression and self-destructive thinking, fewer physical malady symptoms, reduced abuse, and fewer risky drug and sexual behavior among homeless people. different analysis has found that social support is said to higher levels of health and work utilization among homeless persons, and a little body of analysis has found that social support is negatively associated with victimization whereas homeless.

REFERENCES

Fischer, P. J., Shapiro, S., Breakey, W. R., Anthony, J. C., & Kramer, M. (1986). Mental health and social characteristics of the homeless: a survey of mission users. American Journal of Public Health, 76(5), 519-524.
Gory, M. L., Ritchey, F., & Fitzpatrick, K. (1991). Homelessness and affiliation. The sociological quarterly, 32(2), 201-218.
Hwang, S. W., Chambers, C., Chiu, S., Katic, M., Kiss, A., Redelmeier, D. A., & Levinson, W. (2013). A
comprehensive assessment of health care utilization among homeless adults under a system of universal health insurance. American journal of public health, 103(S2), S294- S301.
Khandor, E., Mason, K., & Cowan, L. (2007). The street health report 2007. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Street Health.
Solarz, A., & Bogat, G. A. (1990). When social support fails: The homeless. Journal of Community Psychology, 18(1), 79- 96.

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