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Blastomycosis in Quebec, Canada: Highlighting the Importance of Exposure to Decaying Wood in Patients | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2332-0877

Journal of Infectious Diseases & Therapy
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Case Report

Blastomycosis in Quebec, Canada: Highlighting the Importance of Exposure to Decaying Wood in Patients

Ivan V Litvinov1*, Manon Paradis2 and Donald C Sheppard3
1Division of Dermatology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
2Division of Clinical Sciences, University of Montreal, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada
3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Corresponding Author : Ivan V Litvinov
Division of Dermatology
McGill University Health Centre
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Tel: 514-934-1934
E-mail: [email protected]
Received January 16, 2014; Accepted January 26, 2014; Published February 03, 2014
Citation: Litvinov IV, Paradis M, Sheppard DC (2014) Blastomycosis in Quebec, Canada: Highlighting the Importance of Exposure to Decaying Wood in Patients. J Infect Dis Ther 2:129. doi: 10.4172/2332-0877.1000129
Copyright: © 2014 Litvinov IV, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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Abstract

Blastomycosis is a systemic and cutaneous fungal infection of humans, dogs, cats and other animals that has been reported from parts of North America, Africa and India. In most areas the disease occurs predominantly in individuals exposed to rural agricultural, recreational or wilderness environments. The precise ecological niche for Blastomyces dermatitidis remains undefined. In the current work we report a series of cases of blastomycosis in Quebec associated with exposure to wood as a possible source of infection. This work is consistent with previous reports that demonstrate that wood and wood by-products are able to support the growth of B. dermatitidis and can play an important role in disease pathogenesis. Our findings suggest that it may be important to question blastomycosis patients about exposure to decaying wood as a possible source for acquiring the infection.

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