alexa

GET THE APP

Bruised Badges: The Moral Risks of Police Work and a Call for Officer Wellness | OMICS International| Abstract
ISSN: 1522-4821

International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience
Open Access

Our Group organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)
  • Review Article   
  • Int J Emerg Ment Health 2018, Vol 20(2): 394
  • DOI: 10.4172/1522-4821.1000394

Bruised Badges: The Moral Risks of Police Work and a Call for Officer Wellness

Daniel M. Blumberg1, Konstantinos Papazoglou2* and Sarah Creighton3
1Associate Professor, California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University, San Diego, California 92131, USA
2Clinical & Forensic Psychologist(Supervised Practice), Ontario Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services- Justice Section & Sessional Lecturer, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
3Asst. Chief (Ret.), San Diego Police Department, , San Diego, California 92101, USA
*Corresponding Author : Konstantinos Papazoglou, Clinical & Forensic Psychologist(Supervised Practice), Ontario Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services- Justice Section & Sessional Lecturer, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Jan 01, 1970 / Accepted Date: Jan 01, 1970 / Published Date: Jun 30, 2018

Abstract

The paper takes the position that efforts to eliminate all acts of police misconduct are misguided, because much of this behavior appears to be a natural byproduct of routine police practices. Instead, it is important for police executives to understand the various factors that foster police misconduct. This awareness can be accompanied by appropriate changes to the culture of the organization, which will lead to destigmatizing less egregious acts and a recommitment to fair and consistent discipline. First, the discussion focuses on the individual characteristic of integrity. The potential negative impact on police officer integrity caused by the job itself is presented. Then, to help understand why personal integrity may decline while working as a police officer, a variety of theories to explain unethical decision-making are presented. Based on these explanations, numerous prevention and intervention strategies are offered for organizations to develop more far-reaching approaches to combat misconduct. Reinterpreting integrity as a perishable skill, rather than as a fixed personality characteristic, enables police executives to institute specific improvements to training, supervision, and disciplinary practices

Keywords: Integrity; Ethical decision-making; Preventing police misconduct; Wellness; Emotional intelligence

Top