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Current Attitudes and Practices among Pregnant Women toward Influenza Immunization | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2376-127X

Journal of Pregnancy and Child Health
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Research Article

Current Attitudes and Practices among Pregnant Women toward Influenza Immunization

Sharon Puchalski*, Cheryl Hollema and Brenda Marshall
William Paterson University of New Jersey, Wayne, NJ, United States
Corresponding Author : Sharon Puchalski
William Paterson University of New Jersey, Wayne, NJ, United States
Tel: 1-201-602-0290
E-mail: [email protected]; [email protected]
Received: July 01, 2014; Accepted: July 22, 2015; Published: July 27, 2015
Citation: Puchalski S, Hollema C, Marshall B (2015) Current Attitudes and Practices among Pregnant Women toward Influenza Immunization. J Preg Child Health 2:184. doi:10.4172/2376-127X.1000184
Copyright: © 2015 Puchalski S, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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Abstract

Pregnant women are more vulnerable to severe illness and complications due to influenza infection. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the American College of Obstetrician and Gynecologists recommend that all women who are pregnant during influenza season receive the inactivated influenza vaccine, regardless of trimester. The Centers for Disease Control (2015) reported that only 52.2% of women pregnant during influenza season stated that they had received the influenza immunization. Prenatal visits represent an ideal time for the APN to discuss immunization history and recommend and educate about the importance of influenza immunization during pregnancy and to help reach the Healthy People 2020 goal of 80% of pregnant women to receive the influenza vaccine. The purpose of this study was to explore pregnant women’s knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward influenza immunization and examine vaccination coverage in this population. The purposive, convenience sample was comprised of 60 pregnant women who were recruited from a private obstetrician and gynecologist practice. Fifty-seven percent of pregnant women did not receive the influenza immunization. Maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, and health insurance are independent from the women’s decision to receive the influenza vaccination. Women who believed in the efficacy (x2 (1) = 16.587, p < 0.05) and safety (x2(1) = 12.219, p < 0.05) of the vaccination were more likely to get vaccinated then those who didn’t. Influenza vaccination rates in pregnant women remain low. Understanding pregnant women’s knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to influenza immunization can help to improve vaccination coverage rates among pregnant women.

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Citations : 1639

Journal of Pregnancy and Child Health received 1639 citations as per Google Scholar report

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