alexa
Reach Us +1 218 451 2974
Preventing Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS among Urban Minority Youth: Evidence from a University-Community Partnership | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2155-6105

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy
Open Access

Like us on:

OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)
All submissions will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Research Article

Preventing Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS among Urban Minority Youth: Evidence from a University-Community Partnership

Robert J Reid1*, Danlin Yu2 and Pauline Garcia-Reid3

1College of Education and Human Services, Department of Family and Child Studies, Montclair State University, USA

2College of Science and Mathematics, Earth and Environmental Studies, Montclair State University, USA

3College of Education and Human Services, Department of Family and Child Studies, and Center for Child Advocacy (CHAD), Montclair State University, USA

Corresponding Author:
Robert James Reid
Professor, College of Education and Human Services
Department of Family and Child Studies
Montclair State University, USA
Tel: +973 655 7862
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: May 29, 2014; Accepted date: July 28, 2014; Published date: July 30, 2014

Citation: Reid RJ, Yu D, Garcia PR (2014) Preventing Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS among Urban Minority Youth: Evidence from a University-Community Partnership. J Addict Res Ther 5:186. doi:10.4172/2155-6105.1000186

Copyright: © 2014 Reid RJ, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Purpose: To assess whether evidence-based prevention protocols could positively influence substance abuse and HIV/AIDS knowledge and reduce sexual risk-taking behaviors among urban minority youth. Design: Pretest-posttest design. Setting: Four urban high schools and five summer camp programs located in the North-eastern United States. Subjects: A total of 653 African American and Hispanic/Latino youth, ranging in ages from 13 to 18. Intervention: The intervention for this study incorporated elements from the following evidence-based protocols that have been endorsed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP): Be Proud! Be Responsible!; CASASTART!; Focus on Youth; and Street Smart. Sessions were comprised of six, 50-minute modules that incorporated role-plays, discussions, and multimedia formats to actively educate and engage youth in prevention activities. Measures: This study used the National Minority Substance Abuse / HIV Prevention Initiative Cohort 7 Youth Questionnaire., which was developed by CSAP to be used as part of a national cross site evaluation of all Minority AIDS Initiative (MAI) funded programs throughout the United States. Sexual risk behavior served as our outcome variable, with the following ten predictors being assessed for the study: disapproval / alcohol use, school importance, delinquency/crime, disapproval / tobacco use, disapproval / marijuana use, illicit drug use, stress- related alcohol and drug use, HIV/AIDS knowledge, HIV/AIDS testing, and negative peer attitudes. Analysis: Principal components, multiple imputation, and mulitivariate regression analyses were systematically employed to develop a parsimonious model that included ten predictors of sexual risk. Results: Changes in pre and posttest measures revealed that participants who were at heightened risk were also more inclined to get tested for HIV/AIDS after receiving the intervention (95% confidence level). At posttest, an increase in HIV/AIDS knowledge seemed to have a buffering effect against risky sexual behaviors. Additionally, participants who thought of school more favorably were less likely to engage in sexual risk taking behaviors at posttest (95% confidence level). Conclusion: A combination of evidence-based prevention curricula can help transform knowledge into positive behavioral change.

Keywords

Top