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Sex-Based Differences in Metabolic Equivalents (METs) After Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review | OMICS International| Abstract
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Journal of Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation
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  • Review Article   
  • J Card Pulm Rehabil,
  • DOI: 10.4172/jcpr.1000143

Sex-Based Differences in Metabolic Equivalents (METs) After Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review

Neel A Duggal1*, David A Scalzitti2, Samuel Watkins2, Oliver Hecht2, Stephanie J Johnson2 and Joshua G Woolstenhulme2,3
1Department of Health, Human Function and Rehabilitation Sciences, The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Washington, United States
2Department of Health, Human Function and Rehabilitation Sciences, The GW School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Washington, United States
3The Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Idaho State University, Pocatello, United States
*Corresponding Author : Dr. Neel A Duggal, Department of Health, Human Function and Rehabilitation Sciences, The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Washington, United States, Tel: 781-307-5099, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Jun 30, 2021 / Accepted Date: Jul 14, 2021 / Published Date: Jul 21, 2021

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the differences in peak Metabolic Equivalents (METs) between men and women post myocardial infarction after participating in a Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) program.

Methods: Four databases were systematically searched through August 2020. Search terms related to cardiac rehabilitation, treatment outcomes, and gender differences were used. Papers were considered relevant if they compared outcomes in cardiac rehabilitation between men and women. Information from the studies was extracted by two independent authors. Risk of bias was assessed using the Downs and Black instrument.

Results: A total of 12,786 records were identified from the search and 8 observational studies were included in the final review. Improvements in absolute METs during CR ranged from 1.1 to 2.0 for women and 0.8 to 2.5 for men. Seven studies reported a statistically significant increase in peak METs for both men and for women after outpatient CR. Three of these studies showed a greater increase in absolute METs in men compared to women that were statistically significant. Four studies showed no sex-based differences before and after. Several of these studies reported significant improvements in both men and women in other outcomes including cholesterol, blood glucose, and BMI.

Conclusion: Both men and women improve functional capacity from CR. The majority of studies reported that there were more men participating in CR programs than women. Given the underrepresentation of women in these studies, it is difficult to speculate if any differences in MET levels reported in these studies are a true representation of sex differences with respect to peak MET levels. Nonetheless, the statistically significant improvement in METs in both sexes suggests that women experience clinical benefit from CR and that efforts should be made for greater referral of women to CR programs.

Keywords: Sex; Cardiac Rehabilitation; Cardiovascular Disease; METs

Citation: Duggal NA, Scalzitti DA, Watkins S, Hecht O , Johnson SJ, et al. (2021) Sex-Based Differences in Metabolic Equivalents (METs) After Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review. J Card Pulm Rehabil 5: 143. Doi: 10.4172/jcpr.1000143

Copyright: © 2021 Duggal NA, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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