alexa Socio-Moral Continuity and the Representation of Alcoholism in Four Major American Print Media Sources | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2155-6105

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy
Open Access

Like us on:

Our Group organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

Research Article

Socio-Moral Continuity and the Representation of Alcoholism in Four Major American Print Media Sources

Amy Platt*

School of Social Welfare, Stony Brook University, USA

*Corresponding Author:
Amy Platt
School of Social Welfare
Stony Brook University, USA
E-mail: [email protected], [email protected]

Received date: July 05, 2013; Accepted date: August 30, 2013; Published date: September 10, 2013

Citation: Platt A (2013) Socio-Moral Continuity and the Representation of Alcoholism in Four Major American Print Media Sources. J Addict Res Ther 4:157. doi:10.4172/2155-6105.1000157

Copyright: © 2013 Platt A. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Scholars have long attempted to explain the factors that lead to alcoholism. Indeed, various attempts to characterize alcoholism have been made including the moral model, the temperance model, the disease model, the harm reduction model, the social education model, and the neurobiological model. Since the introduction of the disease model, it has gained wide consensus in the scientific and therapeutic communities, although not in the public at large. In fact, the public seem to be committed primarily to the moral model and to the public health model secondarily, based on the inordinate influence that broadcast and news media have on society. In this study, articles from four major American newspapers are subject to an exploratory content analysis using constructed random samples to explore how these articles portray alcoholism. The presented results show that of a sample of 881 articles, only seven characterize alcoholism as a disease. Given the persistence of the moral model, in the face of the alternative scientific/therapeutic consensus, the theoretical construct of “socio-moral continuity” is introduced.

Keywords

Recommended Conferences
Share This Page
Top